Is it time for a logo redesign? Here are four good reasons to update your logo, and a few reasons not to:

Company Merger — mergers, acquisitions, and company spin offs often require a new logo to act as a common banner and unite the new company.

 Case Study 1: Last year, we were involved in the rebranding as two area electric co-ops merged to form the new Heartland REMC. The year-long process involved numerous communications to customers and internal revisions to get feedback and prepare customers for the transition that was ultimately a great success.

Case Study 1: Last year, we were involved in the rebranding as two area electric co-ops merged to form the new Heartland REMC. The year-long process involved numerous communications to customers and internal revisions to get feedback and prepare customers for the transition that was ultimately a great success.

Making the Most of Technology — was your logo designed before smartphones? Do you have a favicon? Is your logo complex and not easily reproduced? Logos today have different requirements than 20 years ago. Forget legibility on fax machines. Today you can take advantage of digital high-definition displays. There will always be a need for simplified graphics, but today you can add depth and even motion to your logo on many mediums. 

 Case Study 2: We recently adapted the Intri-Cut logo to better represent this cutting edge business, adding dimension and icon alternatives. The new look is sharp, sleek, and capable of being simplified and reproduced in multiple applications.

Case Study 2: We recently adapted the Intri-Cut logo to better represent this cutting edge business, adding dimension and icon alternatives. The new look is sharp, sleek, and capable of being simplified and reproduced in multiple applications.

Company Revitalization — if you’ve been around for a long time, a new logo may be the push you need to stay relevant.

 Case Study 3: Earlier this year, we helped local convenience store chain “Johnson Junction” reinvent itself into the new yet familiar “JJ’s” as company ownership passed to the next generation. They lost the outdated train reference named by their grandfather but kept the initials in honor of that legacy. 

Case Study 3: Earlier this year, we helped local convenience store chain “Johnson Junction” reinvent itself into the new yet familiar “JJ’s” as company ownership passed to the next generation. They lost the outdated train reference named by their grandfather but kept the initials in honor of that legacy. 

Company Growth - sometimes a company grows beyond it’s original identity.

 Case Study 4: At IBA, we have personal experience with this one. Angie started this company nearly a decade ago by herself, working from her home office. Today four of us design for clients in over a dozen states. While the company will always be “Inspired by Angie,” we’ve transitioned the name and mark to “IBA” to better represent our diverse team.

Case Study 4: At IBA, we have personal experience with this one. Angie started this company nearly a decade ago by herself, working from her home office. Today four of us design for clients in over a dozen states. While the company will always be “Inspired by Angie,” we’ve transitioned the name and mark to “IBA” to better represent our diverse team.

If it’s not broke, don’t fix it. Brand recognition takes years to develop. It’s a considerable investment to update stationery, signage, printed materials, website, social media, etc. If you have a limited budget and/or a large following, now may not be the time for an overhaul. Take that budget, keep your logo the same, and instead redesign your printed and online marketing materials starting with those in most need of an update or those that will give you the best ROI. Good designers can take an old logo and revitalize it with new surrounding design elements. We consider ourselves good designers, and we want you to get the most out of your marketing budget. 

Even the big players can get it wrong. Google launched its redesigned logo last week, to mixed reviews. If you have time, read this critique from The New Yorker. There will always be some people who cling to the old brand, but take care to ensure that the majority of your customers are onboard with the new direction.

 Google's new logo launched last week to mixed reviews. Driven by the company's creation of a new parent company Alphabet and subsequent internal restructuring, Google's logo redesign and new corporate structure have fallen flat with many customers and investors.

Google's new logo launched last week to mixed reviews. Driven by the company's creation of a new parent company Alphabet and subsequent internal restructuring, Google's logo redesign and new corporate structure have fallen flat with many customers and investors.

Whatever your reason for rebranding, it’s important to do everything you can to prepare your customers so that the new logo and other company changes are well received. Get outside input as you go through the process and think through all the ways your logo will need to be used. Your new logo should be meaningful, versatile and timeless.

If you think it might be time for your company to rebrand, contact us.  We can help. angie@iba-design.com

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